Potassium Sorbate

Our Potassium Sorbate is extremely high quality, naturally derived, non-toxic, non-synthetic, made from the salt of sorbic acid, a natural, isolated polyunsaturated fat from the oil of the unripened rowan berry or mountain ash berry.

Potassium Sorbate assists in keeping our organic, emulsified products that contain both water and oil safe and protected from mold, fungi, and yeast growth. 

Potassium Sorbate is easily metabolized in the body, biodegradable and is one of the most thoroughly tested, food grade preservatives over the last 50 years. Potassium Sorbate is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) worldwide.

Few substances have had such extensive, rigorous, and long-term testing. It is non-toxic even when taken in large quantities, and breaks down in the body into water and carbon dioxide in the Krebs Cycle. It is metabolized just like any other polyunsaturated fat. Generally used in very small amounts, it is safe, non-toxic and non-sensitizing.

The weight of evidence indicates that Potassium Sorbate is not mutagenic and safe for cosmetic ingredients in present practices of use and concentration . - International Journal of Toxicology 

http://ijt.sagepub.com/content/7/6/837.short

A 2010 study found that potassium sorbate had genotoxic properties—it damaged DNA when administered in large doses to certain white blood cells in vitro. Several chromosomal abnormalities were observed, but no details exist on how severe the damage was or if it was reparable. Additionally, this was an in vitro study, meaning that it was carried out on a cell outside a body’s environment. So far, no research exists that shows genotoxic effects in humans. While in vitro studies are certainly important in helping us understand biological interactions, they cannot be so easily extrapolated to real life (in vivo) exposures. Considering exposure levels and routes is vital to understanding the potential impact of a chemical.

While in vitro studies are certainly important in helping us understand biological interactions, they cannot be so easily extrapolated to real life (in vivo) exposures. Considering exposure levels and routes is vital to understanding the potential impact of a chemical.